NURSING

Week 9 Assignment

Continue on with building your final application due in week 10. You will submit one cogent paper that combines the previous two applications (Parts One and Two) from weeks 4 and 7, plus the new material mentioned in the week 8 application

 

Application: Developing a Health Advocacy Campaign

To be an effective advocate and to develop a successful health advocacy campaign, you must have a clear idea of the goals of your campaign program and be able to communicate those goals to others. In addition, it is the nature of nurses to want to help, but it is important to make sure that the vision you develop is manageable in size and scope. By researching what others have done, you will better appreciate what can realistically be accomplished. It is also wise to determine if others have similar goals and to work with these people to form strategic partnerships. If you begin your planning with a strong idea of your resources, assets, and capabilities, you will be much more likely to succeed and truly make a difference with those you hope to help.

 

You will develop a 10- to 12-page paper that outlines a health advocacy campaign designed to promote policies to improve the health of a population of your choice. This week, you will establish the framework for your campaign by identifying a population health concern of interest to you. You will then provide an overview of how you would approach advocating for this issue.

 

-In Week 9, you will consider legal and regulatory factors that have an impact on the issue and finally, in Week 10, you will identify ethical concerns that you could face as an advocate. Specific details for each aspect of this paper are provided each week.

 

This paper will serve as the Portfolio Application for the course.

Before you begin, review the complete Assignment.

This week, begin developing your health advocacy campaign by focusing on the following:

Week 10 Application

To prepare for this final portion of your paper:

·         Review provisions 7, 8, and 9 of the ANA Code of Ethics in relation to advocacy for population health.

·         Reflect on the ethical considerations you may need to take into account in your advocacy campaign.

·         Research the ethical considerations and lobbying laws relevant to the location where your advocacy campaign will occur.

·         Consider potential ethical dilemmas you might face in your campaign.

 

To complete: Revise and combine parts one and two of you previous papers and add the following:

·         Explain any ethical dilemmas that could arise during your advocacy campaign, and how you would resolve them.

·         Describe the ethics and lobbying laws that are applicable to your advocacy campaign.

·         Evaluate the special ethical challenges that are unique to the population you are addressing.

·         Provide a cohesive summary for your paper.

Reminder: You will submit one cogent paper that combines the previous applications (Parts One and Two) plus the new material.

 

Your paper should be about 10 pages of content, not including the title page and references. Be sure to paste the rubric at the end of your paper.

 

The final application builds upon the applications (Parts One and Two) completed in weeks 4 and 7.

To complete the final section of your paper:

·         Review provisions 7, 8, and 9 of the ANA Code of Ethics in relation to advocacy for population health.

·         Reflect on the ethical considerations you may need to take into account in your advocacy campaign.

·         Research the ethical considerations and lobbying laws relevant to the location where your advocacy campaign will occur.

·         Consider potential ethical dilemmas you might face in your campaign.

 

 

REFERENCES

Milstead, J. A. (2013). Health policy and politics: A nurse’s guide (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

·         Chapter 3, “Government Response: Legislation—Politics: Playing the Game” (pp. 45–71) (review)

This chapter explores the multiple factors that influence the development of public policy through the legislative branch of government.

 

·         Chapter 9, “Policy Nurses Advance Policy Agendas in Many Arenas” (pp. 179–189)

The focus of this chapter is the role of policy nurses within nurse associations and it highlights specific organization that specifically deal with policy nurses and advocacy.

Begley, A. (2010). On being a good nurse: Reflections on the past and preparing for the future. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 16(6), 525–532.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

In this article, the author reflects on the qualities of a good nurse in both the past and present. The article presents a 4-point framework that exemplifies the foundational qualities of modern professional ethics and conduct.

Davis-Alldritt, L. (2011). Presidential inaugural address: Advocacy, access, and achievement. Journal of School Nursing, 27(4), 249–251.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

This address explicates links between school nursing, school health services, and student success. The author uses personal anecdotes to teach lessons in advocacy, access, and achievement.

Deyton, L., Hess, W. J., & Jackonis, M. J. (2008, Winter). War, its aftermath, and U.S. health policy: Toward a comprehensive health program for America’s military personnel, veterans, and their families. Journal of Law, Medicine, & Ethics, 36(4), 677–689.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

Karpf, T., Ferguson, J. T., & Swift, R. (2010). Light still shines in the darkness: Decent care for all. Journal of Holistic Nursing, 28(4), 266–274.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

This article details the challenges of health care crises at the global, national, and local levels. The text proposes a values-based approach to health care that takes into account the voices of the population being served, rather than excluding them.

Paquin, S. O. (2011). Social justice advocacy in nursing: What is it? How do we get there? Creative Nursing, 17(2), 63–67.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

This text defines social justice advocacy and contrasts it to the patient-nurse advocacy model. The article also discusses social justice advocacy’s challenges and their potential solutions.

 

International Council of Nurses. (2008). Promoting health: Advocacy guide for health professionals. Retrieved from http://www.whpa.org/PPE_Advocacy_Guide.pdf

 

This web resource documents the efforts of the International Council of Nurses to ensure quality nursing care for all, as well as sound health policies globally through the advancement of nursing knowledge and presence worldwide.

 

 

Vancouver Coastal Health. (n.d.). Vancouver Coastal Health Population Health: Advocacy guidelines and resources. Retrieved from http://www.vch.ca/media/Population Health_Advocacy Guideline and Resources.pdf

 

This article presents guidelines, parameters, and resources for conducting population health advocacy.

 

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2012g). The needle exchange program. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

Milstead, J. A. (2013). Health policy and politics: A nurse’s guide (Laureate Education, Inc., custom ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

  • Chapter 4, “Government Regulation: Parallel and Powerful” (pp. 73–109)

This chapter explains the major concepts of the regulation of health professionals, with emphasis on advanced practice nurses (APN) and the process of licensure and credentialing.

ANA’s Foundation of Nursing Package – (Access this resource from the Walden Library databases through your NURS 6050 Course Readings List)

  • Guide to the Code of Ethics: Interpretation and Application

    This guide details the history, purpose and theory, application, and case studies of this must-have Code of Ethics.

  • Nursing Social Policy Statement

    The Nursing Social Policy Statement provides an understanding of the social framework and obligations of the nursing profession.

  • Nursing: Scope & Standards of Practice

    This book contains several national standards of practice that can be used to inform the decision-making process, development, implementation, and evaluation of several functions and aspects of advanced practice nursing.

Gallagher, T. H. (2009). A 62-year-old woman with skin cancer who experienced wrong-site surgery: Review of medical error. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, 302(6), 669–677.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

The article showcases the different sides of medical error, from a 62-year-old patient who suffered and the components of the medical error’s impact and aftermath.

Reinhardt, U. E. (2010, Jan 30). Repercussions of simplicity. New York Times, p. A14.

Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

This article determines that the government should take low-income families into account when determining mandatory health insurance because many Americans choose to go without insurance despite preexisting conditions presumably no longer being an issue.

 

Board on Health Care Services. (2007). Preventing medication errors: Quality Chasm Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11623&page=43

This article discusses the multilayered nature of medication error as a system of failures due to individual behaviors and conditions.

 

 

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