Environmental science

Course Syllabus

Course Description

Explores an in-depth study of advanced air quality control science and management practices. Addresses health effects, environmental impacts, monitoring, modeling, and treatment.

Course Textbook(s)

Godish, T., Davis, W. T., & Fu, J. S. (2014). Air quality (5th ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

Course Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

1. Describe methods for monitoring air pollution. 2. Critique air pollutant modeling equations and software. 3. Assess health effects of air pollution. 4. Examine causes of indoor and outdoor air pollution. 5. Evaluate health risks of air pollution exposure. 6. Estimate the impact of air pollution on the environment. 7. Evaluate air pollution control technologies.

Prerequisite(s)

No prerequisite courses are required for enrollment in this course.

Credits

Upon completion of this course, the students will earn 3 hours of college credit.

CSU Online Library

The CSU Online Library is available to support your courses and programs. The online library includes databases, journals, e-books, and research guides. These resources are always accessible and can be reached through the library web page. To access the library, log into the myCSU Student Portal, and click on “CSU Online Library.” You can also access the CSU Online Library from the “My Library” button on the course menu for each course in Blackboard.

The CSU Online Library offers several reference services. E-mail (library@columbiasouthern.edu) and telephone (1.877.268.8046) assistance is available Monday – Thursday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The library’s chat reference service, Ask a Librarian, is available 24/7; look for the chat box on the online library page.

Librarians can help you develop your research plan or assist you in finding relevant, appropriate, and timely information. Reference requests can include customized keyword search strategies, links to articles, database help, and other services.

LibGuides

Think of a LibGuide (a Library Guide) as a mini-website to help you with your assignments. It has relevant information such as databases, e-books, and websites specific to your courses. If you have any questions, please reach out to your friendly

MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control

MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control 1

library staff.

Click here for the LibGuide for this course.

Unit Assignments

Unit I Journal

We are about to work through Godish, Davis, and Fu’s (2014) textbook related to air quality. As such, we are going to be discussing engineering principles related to how we can engineer air quality as a means of controlling air quality. Consequently, we must first consider what constitutes air pollution. What do you believe qualifies as air pollution? Why?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words in length. No references or citations are necessary.

Unit II Journal

In our first unit, we learned about chemical redox reactions that take place in the environment and that often create outdoor air pollution. In our reading, we were introduced to the term sink.

What is the significance of an atmospheric chemical sink—specifically when studying methods to engineer outdoor air quality? How would you explain this in layman’s terms to a company hiring you to help with the permitting process for a new facility?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words in length. No references or citations are necessary.

Unit II Mini Project

Over the course of the next six units, you will be developing a course project. You will complete a single section of the course project in every unit by completing one section of the course project, and then you will add to it with the subsequent work in the following unit. This unit work will be in the form of unit mini projects.

Our course project will be to develop a document titled “A Permit by Rule (PBR) Evaluation for a Painting Operation” and will serve as a simulation of our work as a contract environmental engineer to an industrial organization planning a painting operation within the United States.

The Scenario:

You have contracted with an industrial organization to engineer and write a state air Permit by Rule (PBR) evaluation for a painting operation facility. According to the local state laws and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) laws, the facility must have an air permit before construction begins. Once the facility is completed, the construction air permit will then become the operational air permit for the facility.

As a result, your client wants the air permit to automatically align the painting operation facility into operational compliance with state and federal air quality laws. Consequently, it is extremely important for you to evaluate the planned painting operation against the PBR requirements in order to meet the air permit criteria, using the state guidance document and considering the equipment and chemicals already planned for the facility operations.

You have tabulated the following information from what you have gleaned from the material SDS documents and equipment technical data sheets plan (depending on your scenario selection, each “unit” represents a single aircraft, rail tank car, or vehicle):

Interior Liner Coating Material

10 gallons coating/unit 2 gallons of solvent/unit

Unit Lining Application Apply interior liners to two (2) units/day Work five (5) hours/day and four (4) days/week

Unit Lining Curing Cure interior liners of two (2) units/day Work five (5) hours/day and four (4) days/week

Interior Liner Cure Heater fuel source is natural gas-fired drying oven

Heater generates 2.1 million (MM) Btu/hr at maximum 2,500 hrs/year

Unit Lining Design Cross-draft air plenum Unit interior is the spray area

Exhaust Fan 10,000 ft3/min (CFM) 1 exhaust fan

MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control 2

Air Makeup Unit 5760 ft3/min (CFM) 1 air makeup system

Filter Openings 20.0 ft2 each Two (2) filter openings

Coating WV VOC content 2.8 lb/gal coating

Coating VM Coating volume 1.0 gal

Water Content Per gal/coating 1.0 lb/gal

Water Density Per gal/water 8.34 lb/gal

Coating VW Water volume Calculation

Exempt-solvent Content Per gal/coating 0.5 lb/gal

Exempt-solvent Density Per gal/exempt solvent 6.64 lb/gal

Coating Ves Exempt solvent volume Calculation

Additionally, your state’s department of environmental quality (DEQ) has provided you the following PBR limits:

Potential to Emit (PTE) 100 tons VOC/year

Face Velocity 100 ft/min

Filter Velocity 250 ft/min

VOC/5-hour period 6.0 lbs/hr

Short-term Emissions 1.0 lbs/hr

Long-term Emissions 1.0 tons/yr

From your first visit with your client, these are your notes and process flow sketch reflecting the intended operational design:

The client has designed an interior coating spray painting system that allows the interior of each unit to be coated. The operations will involve a stripped-down unit being brought into the facility’s shop. The shop is a steel building with a finished concrete floor and a paint booth for each unit. The unit will be placed in the spray booth. The booth will be opened at one end of the booth for makeup air. The exhaust air will flow through an exhaust chamber at the other end of the unit. For each unit, once the liner application operations are completed, the forced curing (drying) operations will immediately commence.

Instructions:

1. Closely read the required reading assignment from the textbook and the unit lesson within the study guide, and consider reading the suggested reading.

2. Select the PBR evaluation document to be for only one of the following: (a) an aircraft manufacturing exterior coating paint booth, (b) a rail tank car interior lining process, or (c) a vehicle exterior coating paint booth. You will continue with this scenario selection for the remaining six units, to complete the entire document.

3. Using APA style (title page, abstract page, body with level 1 headings, and a reference page) for a research paper,

MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control 3

begin drafting a PBR evaluation document. You will add to this document in every subsequent unit with another prescribed level 1 heading, building out the entire document one section at a time.

4. Make your Unit II work the first level 1 heading (center, bold) titled “General Considerations for Operation,” and describe the scenario that is presented above, while specifically describing the scenario that you selected (aircraft, tank car, or vehicle). While describing your scenario, you must include the environmental, health, and safety (EHS) implications of the work system while pulling from the textbook as well as any other relevant sources that are presented in the unit lesson in the study guide. In your description of the EHS implications of the system, be sure to discuss the natural and anthropomorphic variables causally related to outdoor air pollution. You are required to describe the scenario in at least 200 words (minimum). You may find it convenient to summarize the tabulated information in your General Considerations section of the permit for future reference throughout the rest of the course, but do not attempt to tabulate the information in the exact order as what is presented here (to avoid a high match in SafeAssign).

5. Also under the first level 1 heading, present a box and line process flow diagram (PFD) drawing of the selected scenario. See the drawing on page 375 of the textbook as an additional example of a PFD if you need assistance understanding how to draw one; do not draw the same system that is provided on that page. Do not hand-draw this, but use the “insert” and “shapes” features within Microsoft Word to construct the PFD. Simple labeled boxes and lines are adequate for this preliminary work, so it is not necessary to present specific shapes in your PFD for your selected scenario.

6. In your abstract section (page 2 of the document), write one or two sentences that reflect your work for this unit. We will be adding one sentence per unit to reflect our work as we go, with the final abstract length being about 8 to 10 sentences long.

In following units (Units III through VII), the unit lessons will contain information related to the interior surface coating operation by means of practical mathematical calculation examples. Consequently, it is imperative that you read the unit lessons within the study guide in every unit, use the math calculation examples provided in each unit lesson, and consider the current (as well as previous) material from the textbook and the additional information cited and referenced in the study guide for every unit. This project will serve as a comprehensive demonstration of your applied learning of engineering air quality.

Your completed mini project should be a minimum of one page, not counting the title page, abstract page, and reference page. You are required to use at least one outside source, which may be your textbook. All sources used, including the textbook, must be referenced; paraphrased and quoted material must have accompanying APA citations.

Unit III Journal

Which do you think poses a greater risk to the overall population in U.S. homes: radon or biological contaminants? Why? Do you think it could vary by region? Why?

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words in length. No references or citations are necessary.

Unit III Mini Project

As a continuation of our course project due in Unit VII (a Permit by Rule (PBR) Evaluation for Painting Operation Facility), complete the next section—VOC and ES Content per Unit—of your proposal by following the instructions carefully, and then submit your continued draft of your evaluation document into Blackboard for grading.

1. Closely read the required reading assignment from the textbook and the unit lesson in the study guide, and consider reading the suggested reading.

2. Open your proposal draft from Unit II, and make any improvements to your draft using your professor’s feedback from the Unit II Mini Project.

3. Open the Unit III Study Guide, and review the calculations demonstrated and explained (specifically regarding VOC and ES weights per gallon and per unit for our given scenario data). Be sure to use the scenario data instead of the data used in the study guide examples.

4. Make your Unit III work the second level 1 heading, titled “VOC and ES Content per Unit.” Describe the environmental, health, and safety (EHS) implications of VOCs in the work system while pulling from the textbook as well as any other relevant sources that are presented in the unit lesson in the study guide. In your description of the EHS implications of the system, be sure to discuss the natural and anthropomorphic variables causally related to indoor air pollution. Perform and present (not hand-written, but neatly typed) the calculations for both the VOC and ES values (in lbs) in this section of your project.

5. In your abstract section (page 2 of the document), write one or two sentences that reflect your work for this unit. Remember that we are adding one sentence per unit to reflect our work as we go, with the final abstract length being about 8 to 10 sentences long.

Your narrative and calculations for the VOC and ES content per unit must be presented in at least 200 words (minimum). You are required to use at least one outside source, which may be your textbook. All sources used, including the textbook, must be referenced; paraphrased and quoted material must have accompanying APA citations.

Unit IV Journal

Consider that an employee within a company-sponsored (OSHA required) medical monitoring program for your industry has just had an annual work physical and now reports to have pulmonary stress, hearing damage, and elevated blood lead (Pb) concentrations that were not previously reported on the employee’s pre-employment exam. As a result, the human resources manager has asked you to help determine what work-related variables may have contributed to the employee’s impacted health. What variables would you need to consider from within the work system, and what questions would you need to ask the worker to consider from within the worker’s area of residence? How would you attempt to delineate the air quality impacts from the employee’s work system and home?

MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control 4

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words. No references or citations are necessary.

Unit IV Mini Project

As a continuation of our course project due in Unit VII (A Permit by Rule (PBR) Evaluation for Painting Operation Facility), complete the next section—Operational Air Emission Rates—of your proposal by following the instructions carefully, and then submit your continued draft of your evaluation document into Blackboard for grading.

1. Closely read the required reading assignment from the textbook as well as the unit lesson in the study guide. 2. Open your proposal draft from Unit III, and make any improvements to your draft using your professor’s feedback from

the Unit III Mini Project. 3. Open the Unit IV Study Guide, read the Unit IV Lesson, and then review the calculations demonstrated and explained

regarding the operational air emission rates, 5-hour average period, and potential to emit (PTE) statistical model calculations for our scenario. Be sure to use the scenario data instead of the data used in the study guide examples.

4. Make your Unit IV work the third level 1 heading, titled “Operational Air Emission Rates.” Describe the environmental, health, and safety (EHS) implications of VOCs in the work system while pulling from the textbook as well as any other relevant sources that are presented in the unit lesson in the study guide. In your description of the EHS implications of the system, be sure to discuss the natural and anthropomorphic variables causally related to adverse health effects on humans. Perform and present (not hand-written, but neatly typed) the calculations for the following in this section of your project: (a) calculating maximum hourly and annual emission rates, (b) reporting the emission rate averaged over a five-hour average period compared to the DEQ permit limits, and (c) reporting the potential to emit compared to the DEQ permit limits.

5. In your abstract section (page 2 of the document), write one or two sentences that reflect your work for this unit. Remember that we are adding one sentence per unit to reflect our work as we go, with the final abstract length being about 8 to 10 sentences long.

Your narrative and calculations for operational air emission rates must be presented in at least 200 words (minimum). You are required to use at least one outside source, which may be your textbook. All sources used, including the textbook, must be referenced; paraphrased and quoted material must have accompanying APA citations.

Unit V Journal

Oil field companies are often known for keeping a well-serviced fleet of trucks for their staff employees, including often replacing these trucks for aesthetic purposes in order to maintain a strong marketing position within their competitive marketplace of client oil and gas producers. One of the most notable deteriorations of oil field service vehicles with relatively little age and mileage is the exterior paint coating of the vehicle. What air pollutants might be responsible for the deterioration of the vehicle paint color, luster, and integrity? Carefully explain your answer from a chemical perspective.

Your journal entry must be at least 200 words in length. No references or citations are necessary.

Order now and get 10% discount on all orders above $50 now!!The professional are ready and willing handle your assignment.

ORDER NOW »»