ENGLISH

Question 13 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(LC)

Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2
By Mary Shelley

Victor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:

Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.

Which line from the text states that the narrator was young at the time?

[removed] By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth. . .

[removed] I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation. . .

[removed] In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics. . .

[removed] . . .the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.


 

Question 14 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(LC)

Frankenstein Chapter 2, Excerpt 2
By Mary Shelley

Victor Frankenstein continues recounting the influences that lead to his great experiment:

Before this I was not unacquainted with the more obvious laws of electricity. On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me. All that he said threw greatly into the shade Cornelius Agrippa, Albertus Magnus, and Paracelsus, the lords of my imagination; but by some fatality the overthrow of these men disinclined me to pursue my accustomed studies. It seemed to me as if nothing would or could ever be known. All that had so long engaged my attention suddenly grew despicable. By one of those caprices of the mind which we are perhaps most subject to in early youth, I at once gave up my former occupations, set down natural history and all its progeny as a deformed and abortive creation, and entertained the greatest disdain for a would-be science which could never even step within the threshold of real knowledge. In this mood of mind I betook myself to the mathematics and the branches of study appertaining to that science as being built upon secure foundations, and so worthy of my consideration.

Read this sentence from the text:

In this mood of mind

What does this line say about the narrator?

[removed] He made up his mind after careful consideration.

[removed] He made up his mind based on his annoyance.

[removed] He made up his mind by getting good advice.

[removed] He made up his mind to quit working altogether.


 

Question 15 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(LC)

Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:

It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.

Considering the use of the word agitated in this line, what is the most likely meaning of the word convulsive?

[removed] Smooth

[removed] Gentle

[removed] Agile

[removed] Jerky


 

Question 16 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(MC)

Read Article IX of the United States Bill of Rights:

The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

What is the main effect of setting the phrase of certain rights off with commas following the introductory phrase the enumeration of the Constitution?

[removed] It emphasizes the rights are what should not be misconstrued.

[removed] It emphasizes the rights belong to the people not the Constitution.

[removed] It makes the rights more important than the Constitution.

[removed] It suggests that some rights are more important than others.


 

Question 17 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(MC)

Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:

I had gazed on him while unfinished; he was ugly then, but when those muscles and joints were rendered capable of motion, it became a thing such as even Dante could not have conceived.

Which definition of render is most likely suited for this line?

[removed] 14th Century: delivered

[removed] 15th Century: returned

[removed] 16th Century: depicted

[removed] 20th Century: made


 

Question 18 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(MC)

Read this line from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:

Sometimes my pulse beat so quickly and hardly that I felt the palpitation of every artery; at others, I nearly sank to the ground through languor and extreme weakness.

Which definition of hardly is most likely suited for this line?

[removed] Early 16th Century: With trouble or hardship

[removed] Middle English—Early 19th Century: With energy or force

[removed] Middle 16th Century: Barely, only just; not quite

[removed] Middle 16th Century: Not easily


 

Question 19 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(MC)

Read these lines from Macbeth:

The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day:
Now spurs the lated traveller apace,
To gain the timely inn; and near approaches
The subject of our watch.

Which of the following correctly describes how the word gain is used here?

[removed] It suggests an increase of some value.

[removed] It suggests earning something.

[removed] It suggests reaching a place.

[removed] It suggests something owned.


 

Question 20 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

(LC)

Which sentence uses syntax for emphasis?

[removed] Ask not what your country can do for you. . . John F. Kennedy

[removed] Few men have virtue to withstand the highest bidder. . . George Washington

[removed] One man with courage is a majority. . . Thomas Jefferson

[removed] The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it. . . Abraham L

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