ENGLISH

Which pair correctly uses a hyphen?

[removed] Four-million

[removed] Two-thousand

[removed] One-hundred

[removed] Three-fifths


 

Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Which trio correctly uses a hyphen?

[removed] Sun-dried tomatoes

[removed] Cold-damp weather

[removed] Old-worn sofa

[removed] Bright-green leaves


 

Question 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Read the sentence below and answer the following question:

What had been the study and desire of the wisest men since the creation of the world was now within my grasp—Shelley, Frankenstein

Which of the following does the syntax of this sentence emphasize?

[removed] The creation of the world

[removed] The narrator’s grasp

[removed] The desire of wise men

[removed] What had once been


 

Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Read the sentences below and answer the following question:

I would be able to attend the party. I could only arrive after the meal.

Which sentence below provides the best sentence variety using subordination?

[removed] After the meal service, I will arrive because I am attending the party.

[removed] I would be able to attend the party but only after the meal was served.

[removed] I would be arriving after the meal was served but was coming nonetheless.

[removed] While I would be able to attend the party, I could only arrive after the meal.


 

Question 9 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

The purpose of the Federalist Papers was to express concern about the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation, the document that outlined the first government of the United States of America. Alexander Hamilton, among others, wrote the Federalist Papers to persuade doubtful New Yorkers to vote in favor of the stronger federal government proposed in the United States Constitution.

Read this excerpt from Federalist Paper No. 1 and answer the question that follows:

Federalist Papers: No. 1
General Introduction
For the Independent Journal
Author: Alexander Hamilton

To the People of the State of New York:

AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficiency of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than the existence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which it is composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interesting in the world. It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.

Among the most formidable of the obstacles which the new Constitution will have to encounter may readily be distinguished the obvious interest of a certain class of men in every State to resist all changes which may hazard a diminution of the power, emolument, and consequence of the offices they hold under the State establishments; and the perverted ambition of another class of men, who will either hope to aggrandize themselves by the confusions of their country, or will flatter themselves with fairer prospects of elevation from the subdivision of the empire into several partial confederacies than from its union under one government.

Based on this sentence from the first paragraph, why does Hamilton think it is important for the United States to be successful?

It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.

[removed] Its success will give more power to other rulers around the world.

[removed] Without the United States, governments around the world will fall apart.

[removed] Its success will show that it is possible for people to make their own government.

[removed] Without the United States, people will have no reason to behave civilly.


 

Question 10 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Read these two sentences:

  • I can see the point of those who argue that space projects should be a national priority.
  • I also see the problem with spending millions with so many other social problems that need solving.

Which transition word correctly links the two sentences?

[removed] Consequently

[removed] Conversely

[removed] Specifically

[removed] Regardless


 

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