ENGLISH

Read this excerpt from Federalist Paper No. 1 and answer the question that follows:

Federalist Papers: No. 1
General Introduction
For the Independent Journal
Author: Alexander Hamilton

AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficiency of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than the existence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which it is composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interesting in the world. It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.

Based on this quote from the excerpt, with which of these statements would Hamilton agree?

It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.

[removed] The new Constitution would be important to the entire world.

[removed] The Constitutional Convention was ignored by governments all over the world.

[removed] The forces that shape a country are more often mere coincidence.

[removed] When the Constitution was complete the world’s leaders were impressed.


 

Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Read this excerpt from Federalist Paper No. 1 and answer the question that follows:

Federalist Papers: No. 1
General Introduction
For the Independent Journal
Author: Alexander Hamilton

This idea will add the inducements of philanthropy to those of patriotism, to heighten the solicitude which all considerate and good men must feel for the event. Happy will it be if our choice should be directed by a judicious estimate of our true interests, unperplexed and unbiased by considerations not connected with the public good. But this is a thing more ardently to be wished than seriously to be expected. The plan offered to our deliberations affects too many particular interests, innovates upon too many local institutions, not to involve in its discussion a variety of objects foreign to its merits, and of views, passions and prejudices little favorable to the discovery of truth.

Which of the following statements supports the idea presented in this quote from the excerpt?

The plan offered to our deliberations affects too many particular interests, innovates upon too many local institutions, not to involve in its discussion a variety of objects foreign to its merits…

[removed] Hamilton feared the focus on regional interests would undermine the process of honest reform.

[removed] Hamilton would have replaced all those who participated in the first reform efforts if he could have.

[removed] Hamilton wanted to undermine the actors in the reform process, despite their good intentions.

[removed] Those involved in past reform efforts were completely motivated by personal gain.


 

Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[HC]

Read this excerpt from Federalist Paper No. 1 and answer the question that follows:

Federalist Papers: No. 1
General Introduction
For the Independent Journal
Author: Alexander Hamilton

It is not, however, my design to dwell upon observations of this nature. I am well aware that it would be disingenuous to resolve indiscriminately the opposition of any set of men (merely because their situations might subject them to suspicion) into interested or ambitious views. Candor will oblige us to admit that even such men may be actuated by upright intentions; and it cannot be doubted that much of the opposition which has made its appearance, or may hereafter make its appearance, will spring from sources, blameless at least, if not respectable–the honest errors of minds led astray by preconceived jealousies and fears. So numerous indeed and so powerful are the causes which serve to give a false bias to the judgment, that we, upon many occasions, see wise and good men on the wrong as well as on the right side of questions of the first magnitude to society. This circumstance, if duly attended to, would furnish a lesson of moderation to those who are ever so much persuaded of their being in the right in any controversy. And a further reason for caution, in this respect, might be drawn from the reflection that we are not always sure that those who advocate the truth are influenced by purer principles than their antagonists. Ambition, avarice, personal animosity, party opposition, and many other motives not more laudable than these, are apt to operate as well upon those who support as those who oppose the right side of a question. Were there not even these inducements to moderation, nothing could be more ill-judged than that intolerant spirit which has, at all times, characterized political parties. For in politics, as in religion, it is equally absurd to aim at making proselytes by fire and sword. Heresies in either can rarely be cured by persecution.

Which of the following correctly summarizes the main point of this text from the excerpt?

And a further reason for caution, in this respect, might be drawn from the reflection that we are not always sure that those who advocate the truth are influenced by purer principles than their antagonists.

[removed] Enemies will undermine those with good intentions at every turn.

[removed] In an effort this large, caution is to be remembered in all parts of the process.

[removed] Many who seem to support moral choices may also have questionable motives.

[removed] Those on the side of good will always know those who oppose them.


 

Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Which source would provide credible information about the life of jazz musician Charlie Parker?

[removed] A biography entitled The High Life And Hard Times of Charlie (Yardbird) Parker

[removed] A biography on wikipedia that includes sources

[removed] A magazine article comparing Parker musical style to that of new jazz legends

[removed] A dramatic film about Charlie Parker entitled Bird released in theaters (1988)

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