English

02.00 Carousel of Progress Pre-test

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Question 1 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Which source would provide credible information to use in a writing project focusing on primate research efforts in the United States?

[removed] A blog by someone who volunteers at a research facility

[removed] A website that hosts scientists’ peer-reviewed studies

[removed] A website hosted by a biology club

[removed] A wiki site that allows users to post their own research


 

Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Read the sentences below and answer the following question:

I would be able to attend the party. I could only arrive after the meal.

Which sentence below provides the best sentence variety using subordination?

[removed] After the meal service, I will arrive because I am attending the party.

[removed] I would be able to attend the party but only after the meal was served.

[removed] I would be arriving after the meal was served but was coming nonetheless.

[removed] While I would be able to attend the party, I could only arrive after the meal.


 

Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

Read the sentence below and answer the following question:

Had I right, for my own benefit, to inflict this curse upon everlasting generations?—Shelley, Frankenstein

Which of the following correctly describes the syntax of this excerpt?

[removed] Ending with the word generations emphasizes the narrator’s sense of importance.

[removed] Placing the phrase had I right at the beginning of the sentence emphasizes the narrator’s doubt.

[removed] Using the verb phrase to inflict emphasizes the painful nature of the narrator’s decision.

[removed] Using the word curse suggests the narrator sees himself as more powerful than he is.


 

Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Read this excerpt from “Schenck v. U.S., 249 U.S. 47 (1919)” and answer the question that follows:

The document in question upon its first printed side recited the first section of the Thirteenth Amendment, said that the idea embodied in it was violated by the conscription act and that a conscript is little better than a convict. In impassioned language it intimated that conscription was despotism in its worst form and a monstrous wrong against humanity in the interest of Wall Street’s chosen few. It said, ‘Do not submit to intimidation,’ but in form at least confined itself to peaceful measures such as a petition for the repeal of the act. The other and later printed side of the sheet was headed ‘Assert Your Rights.’ It stated reasons for alleging that any one violated the Constitution when he refused to recognize ‘your right to assert your opposition to the draft,’ and went on, ‘If you do not assert and support your rights, you are helping to deny or disparage rights which it is the solemn duty of all citizens and residents of the United States to retain.’ It described the arguments on the other side as coming from cunning politicians and a mercenary capitalist press, and even silent consent to the conscription law as helping to support an infamous conspiracy.

Which of following describes an intended outcome of the protest document?

[removed] To deny or disparage rights

[removed] To violate the Thirteenth Amendment

[removed] To repeal of the conscription act

[removed] To submit to intimidation


 

Question 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Read this excerpt from “Schenck v. U.S., 249 U.S. 47 (1919)” and answer the question that follows:

The document in question upon its first printed side recited the first section of the Thirteenth Amendment, said that the idea embodied in it was violated by the conscription act and that a conscript is little better than a convict. In impassioned language it intimated that conscription was despotism in its worst form and a monstrous wrong against humanity in the interest of Wall Street’s chosen few. It said, ‘Do not submit to intimidation,’ but in form at least confined itself to peaceful measures such as a petition for the repeal of the act. The other and later printed side of the sheet was headed ‘Assert Your Rights.’ It stated reasons for alleging that any one violated the Constitution when he refused to recognize ‘your right to assert your opposition to the draft,’ and went on, ‘If you do not assert and support your rights, you are helping to deny or disparage rights which it is the solemn duty of all citizens and residents of the United States to retain.’ It described the arguments on the other side as coming from cunning politicians and a mercenary capitalist press, and even silent consent to the conscription law as helping to support an infamous conspiracy.

Which of the following is a statement supported by the protest document?

[removed] Deny or disparage rights

[removed] Support an infamous conspiracy

[removed] Silently consent to the conscription

[removed] Do not submit to intimidation


 

Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Which prefix and word combination correctly uses a hyphen?

[removed] Ex-husband

[removed] Pre-school

[removed] Etract

[removed] Re-tell


 

Question 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Which pair correctly uses a hyphen?

[removed] Four-million

[removed] Two-thousand

[removed] One-hundred

[removed] Three-fifths


 

Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]

A student is writing the conclusion to a research-based article about funding for the space program. Which of the following would best conclude that argument?

[removed] A statement that introduces a new idea

[removed] A statement that reiterates the significance on the topic

[removed] A statement that includes a quote from a famous astronaut

[removed] A statement that explains the student’s interest in the space program


 

Question 9 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]

Read this excerpt from Federalist Paper No. 1 and answer the question that follows:

Federalist Papers: No. 1
General Introduction
For the Independent Journal
Author: Alexander Hamilton

To the People of the State of New York:

AFTER an unequivocal experience of the inefficiency of the subsisting federal government, you are called upon to deliberate on a new Constitution for the United States of America. The subject speaks its own importance; comprehending in its consequences nothing less than the existence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which it is composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interesting in the world. It has been frequently remarked that it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a wrong election of the part we shall act may, in this view, deserve to be considered as the general misfortune of mankind.

Among the most formidable of the obstacles which the new Constitution will have to encounter may readily be distinguished the obvious interest of a certain class of men in every State to resist all changes which may hazard a diminution of the power, emolument, and consequence of the offices they hold under the State establishments; and the perverted ambition of another class of men, who will either hope to aggrandize themselves by the confusions of their country, or will flatter themselves with fairer prospects of elevation from the subdivision of the empire into several partial confederacies than from its union under one government.

According to Hamilton’s writing in the second paragraph, what is one reason the new Constitution would be opposed?

[removed] Too many positions will be open for leaders in the newly created government.

[removed] Many people are interested in everyone being granted equal status.

[removed] People think it would be easier obtain powerful positions with a divided government.

[removed] The government already in place at the time was functioning well.

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