Education

HILD OBSERVATION ASSIGNMENT REPORT

Summer 2019

 

CHILD OBSERVTION REPORT DESCRIPTION:

will write two separate child Observation Reports to fulfill these assignments involving observing a child of different ages (an infant OR toddler age  and an early childhood OR a school-age child) and will then use the child observation notes as a basis for writing a report about the child’s development in the domains. Each report is worth 65 points. It is a course requirement that students complete both observation reports. If a student does not pass in the Observation Reports the notes will not be graded for credit. If a student does not pass in both observations any extra credit points will not be graded as part of the final grade.  Students should use the Child Observation Grading Report Form for the report. Do not make your own form or copy/change the form in any way. Do not pass in a grading form that you have made a PDF document. 

FINAL CHILD OBSERVATION REPORT DUE DATES:

Observation One-Choose either the Infant OR Toddler age for the observation report  (4 months- 2.4 years). The Observation Notes Form is Due 7/26 and the Child Observation Report Grading Form is Due 7/29 by 11:30 PM.   Submit the child observation notes form and the child observation report grading form titled with your name and the name of the observation on Moodle using the assignment link.  The observation notes should be written as a separate document using the Observation Notes Form in the Observation folder. After submitting the Observation Notes Form, the notes should then be copied to the end of the Child Observation Report Grading Form that will be submitted later.

Observation Two– Choose either the Early Childhood observation paper-(3 to 5 years) OR  School-age observation paper (6-11 years). The Due Date for the Child Observation Report  Notes is 8/17  by 11:30 PM. The Child Observation Two Grading Form with the notes copied to the end due date is 8/20 by 11:30 PM. Note: If you choose a child who is 2 years four months for Observation One do not do Observation Two on a 3 year old.

**Note:   All students should do Observation One on a child who is between 4 months and 2 years four months. For Observation Two students who are early childhood education majors should complete the early childhood observation (3-5 years). If you are an education major, you should complete the middle childhood age report (6-11 years) unless you cannot find a child of that age group and then you may do the report on the early childhood age. You may choose the early childhood or middle childhood age child if you are human services or another major.

If a student does not have a child for the report, students may visit a referred child care site for an observation of a toddler and/or preschool age child.  Students will need to sign up ahead of time with the course Professor and receive a letter of introduction to set up a visit to the referred child care center. Students will need to contact the center director to set up the observation time after the director is notified by the course Professor. A letter of introduction will need to be brought to the site with the student BHCC ID or driver’s license if not a regular BHCC student. Students should not contact the director of the center unless they have given their name and received a letter of introduction from the course professor. The address for the program will also be posted.

CHILD OBSERVATION AND REPORT DESCRIPTION:

Audience for this Assignment:

You are to take the role of an observer spending a minimum at least 60 minutes observing each child and recording your observation notes for your report. You may also spend more time with the child and write the observation notes for sections of time.  Each set of instructions below details the ages of children to be observed and other particulars to consider when looking for developmental trends as you observe children of different ages. Possible observation ideas are presented at the end of this assignment as an appendix for your use to assure strong, observational experiences. Set up these observations to get the most out your time to see as much about the child’s development as possible. Review the developmental child development information in your textbook, developmental checklists posted on Moodle or from other reliable resources for further ideas of what to look for before you observe the child.

Sites for observations: You may use the following sites for observing your children for this assignment—child’s home, your home, child’s center or school, or other site i.e. playground. Students should not observe children in a public setting that they do not know

Competencies from the course involved in this assignment:

While this assignment involves most of the competencies listed on the syllabus, the primary objective for this assignment will allow you to meet the following competencies fully as you complete the course.

Promoting Child development and learning:

1. Knowing and understanding children’s characteristics and needs. (Level I, II, & III)

2. Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on development and learning. (Level I, II, III)

3. Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments. (Level I, II, III)

Family and community relationships:

4. Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics. (Level I, II, III)

Assessment and evaluation of young children:

5. Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment.

6. Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches. (Level I, II, III)

Using Developmentally Effective Approaches to Connect

with Children and Families:

7. Understanding positive relationships and supportive interactions as a foundation of work with children. (Level I, II, III)

8. Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning practices. (Level I, II, III)

9. Reflecting on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child. (Level I, II, III)

Using Content Knowledge to Build Meaningful Curriculum

10. Knowing and using central concepts, inquiry tools and structures of content area and/or academic disciplines.

11. Using their own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula for each child. (Level I, II, III)

Professionalism:

12. Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice. (Level I, II, III)

 

Process and Format for Completing Each of the Reports

The process for observing involves the following:

  • Make an      appointment to observe your child, even if you are going somewhere that is      familiar. Everyone involved should      be informed as to your purpose in the observation. It may be required that you obtain      written permission from a parent to observe the child. Check this ahead of time with the      program, director, and/or the parent. Some programs have a blanket approval for all observations. You      will be changing the child’s name and the names any other children in the      observation or you may use initials.
  • Plan      your observation well ahead of the due date. All sorts of problems can occur with      observations (you don’t get the information you need; the child is sick;      the setting is chaotic the day you arrive, etc.) so you will need extra      time to complete the assignment.
  • Before      you go to observe the child, be clear about the child you are going to      observe and the setting in which you will observe. Who is the child, where will you be      observing, what expectations does the setting have for your interaction      with the child? You do not need to interact with the child to do the      observation.
  • Be      careful if you know the child. This      relationship often interferes with objectivity. If you are observing a child you are      acquainted with, or know well, plan to be objective and to stay less      emotionally attached than you might normally behave. You should only write      about the behaviors you observed in the observation and not about other      times you spent with the child.
  • Have      your note paper set up ahead of time and plan your observation activities      so you know what you will do when you arrive to observe. Plan for all the      supplies you need (i.e., paper, pencil(s), props to help child with play,      if needed, etc.). If you are observing a child you do not know in a child      care setting, you can observe the child without interacting with them. You      should follow the direction of the staff at the child care center about      how you should interact with the child during the observation time.
  • You      will need to write the observation anecdotal notes using objective      statements using the child observation notes form before the report is      written. The observation notes are used to identify the behaviors and the      domains of development discussed in the observation report. Students      should not write about any behaviors that were not observed during the      observation time. Do not include any subjective statements i.e. child was      angry, happy, sad and do not include your interpretations of the child’s      behavior and development. The notes will also be submitted for credit as      part of the observation report assignment. The notes should be written      into complete sentences from the notes taken during the observation time.   Use      details and be descriptive in your writing so the child’s actions,      behaviors, and activities are clear to the reader.  You do not need to pass in the field notes.      Students should complete the observation notes form that includes the      information about the child and the setting etc. A copy should be      downloaded from the Observation Folder on Moodle.

Format for the Observation Report:

The format for each report is discussed in detail below and you should follow this process for writing the report using the child observation grading form.

· Use the Child Observation Notes form to submit your observation notes written in complete sentences. The form is found in the Observation Folder.

· Use the Child Observation Report Grading Form to record your child observation report that can be downloaded from the Observation Folder.

· The Child Observation Report Grading Form has seven sections. The sections are clearly explained below. Using the observation report answer form found in the week folder, follow the topic section headings in the report to ensure that you write all of the report. The answer form also has an overview file that includes the directions for writing the report. Student should follow the directions on the overview form when writing the report. 

· Students will be choosing three behaviors that each span two domains (biosocial, cognitive, language, social, emotional, cognitive, creative and self-help). The self-help domain information is located in the developmental checklist labeled Developmental Birth to Five Adapted and revised by the Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center, 2012. These three behaviors will be the basis for your report and will be discussed using the same format. Do not use a behavior that is an example of one domain. The format will be discussed below.

· The three behaviors will be labeled as Behavior One, Behavior Two and Behavior Three. The domains you can discuss are biosocial, cognitive, language, emotional, social, creative and self-help.

Child Observation Report Grading Form

Title: Your Name and Observation One Infant OR Toddler or Observation Two Early Childhood OR Middle Childhood

Students should download the Child Observation Report Grading Form from Moodle

Part One: Introduction 

Introduction

Write an introductory paragraph that will state the purpose of your child observation report. You are observing a child to describe and explain domains of development and how these domains intersect with one another as the child grows.  Give information about the child i.e. age, setting that was listed on the Observation Report Form. You can include other information if important to the observation report i.e. the child is bilingual. Do not describe any behaviors that were not observed in the observation time i.e. you know the child from birth and you discuss the child’s development from the past.

Part Two: Behavior One 

Behavior One and Two Domains

Choose one of the behaviors that span two domains taken directly from the observation notes. The behavior notes will be labeled as Behavior One. Use the exact notes from the observation written in objective statements and do not interpret or discuss the behavior in this paragraph. Identify two domains that the behavior is an example of.  List the two domains that you will be discussing under the Domain One and Domain Two paragraphs.

Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph you will state the domain that you will be discussing for Behavior One Domain One.  Then describe at least one quote that is a statement about what the typical development is in that domain for the child’s age and/or developmental level from the text, another reliable source (handout or website) or a developmental checklist. The course text must be used for some of the quotes and use (Santrock, pg. 100) to document where you got the quote in the text. You should also state the title of the handout or the title of the developmental checklist with the age.  A quote that is a definition of the domain being discussed is not accepted as a quote for credit. If you do not use a quote about typical development, your discussion for the child’s development will be your opinion only and you will not get credit for the behavior domain discussion. It can be compared to writing a research paper without using any citations.  More than one quote may be used. Students may get a total of three extra credit points for the entire report.

Behavior One Domain One Analysis to the Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph the student will discuss how the behavior in the first domain described relates to developmental norms for the age of the child being observed or the quote about typical development from the text, handout or developmental checklist.  Discuss how the observed behaviors are like or unlike the description about typical development that you quoted in the paragraph from the text or other reliable source.  This paragraph should have at least four sentences.

Behavior One Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph the student will be use the same format as above to discuss Behavior One Domain Two that was identified in the Behavior One paragraph. In this paragraph state the second domain you will be discussing for Behavior One and then list the quote and resource about typical development that you found in the text, handout, or developmental checklist.

Behavior One Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph describe how the child’s behavior compares to the quote about typical development or is not typical compared to the quote about development. This paragraph should have at least four sentences.

Part Three: Behavior Two

Behavior Two and Two Domains

Choose the second example of behavior labeled that spans two developmental domains from your observation notes and insert the behavior observation notes taken directly from the notes into the paragraph. State the two domains you will be discussing for Behavior Two

Behavior Two Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph for Behavior Two Domain Two include a quote about typical development with a resource for where you got the quote.

Behavior Two Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

In this paragraph you will then compare the child’s development to the quote about typical development or how the behavior is different from the quotes. This paragraph should be at least four sentences.

Behavior Two Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph describe Behavior Two Domain Two that includes a quote about typical development with a resource for where you got the quote. You are using the same behavior for Behavior One from above but are using a different domain.

Behavior Two Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

In this paragraph compare the child’s development to the quote about typical development or how the behavior is different from the quote.  This discussion should be at least four sentences.

Part Four: Behavior Three

Behavior Three and Two Domains

Then continue to the third example of behavior that spans two developmental domains taken directly from the observation notes. Describe the two domains that you will be discussing in the Behavior Three paragraphs.

Behavior Three Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph insert a quote about typical development for Behavior Three Domain One and resource from the text, developmental checklist or handout.

 

Behavior Three Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph include an analysis of how your child’s behavior compares to the statement about typical development or how the behavior is different than the behavior described in the quote. This paragraph should be at least four sentences.

 

Behavior Three Domain Two Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph you will be using the same behavior for Behavior Two but will be discussing a second domain. List the Behavior Three Domain Two you will now be discussing. In this paragraph insert a quote about typical development for Behavior Three Domain Two with a resource from the text, developmental checklist or handout.

Behavior Three Domain Two Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development

In this paragraph include an analysis of how your child’s behavior compares to the statement about typical development or how the behavior is different than the behavior described in the quote. This paragraph should include four sentences.

Part Five: Summary of the Child’s Growth and Development

Complete your child observation report with a summary statement that restates your purpose drawing from your thesis in the introductory paragraph. “How is the whole child’s development progressing?”  Consider what the observation tells you about the child’s development, what skills would be expected to emerge next, and how teachers and parents can help -the child to grow and develop these skills.  Give examples from your report about the child’s development in the domains. Summarize and discuss the child’s growth development from the child observation report in all of the domains you observed. Give examples of what you learned about the child’s growth and development in the domains that were the most important to you as the observer. This paragraph should have at least 8 sentences.

Part Six: Resources

Students should list all of the resources used for the quotes about typical development. Include the following information for the resource list- the title of a text, author and edition, publisher and date of publication, title of handout and author, title of developmental checklist with source/author and title of website, website address and page resource used from the website with author if an article. You must use your text for some of the quotes.

Part Seven:  Observation Notes Form

The Observation Notes Form found in the Observation Folder includes the information about the child who is being observed should be inserted at the end of the Child Observation Report Grading Form. The notes should be written in complete sentences using a story format. The statements about the child should be written using objective (fact) not subjective (opinion) language.  The observation notes should be submitted separately as well before the child observation report grading form so the Professor knows the students has completed the observation and has written the notes.

Observation Notes for Observation Assignment

When observing each child for your Observation Assignment, you should record the behavior of the child using objective statements. An objective statement includes what you see the child doing or saying and not any of your interpretations or thoughts about the child’s behavior. You should include the physical, emotional, social and cognitive development including language. This form should be completed for each observation. It will be posted on Moodle in case you need to download it.

Recorder’s Name:  Child’s Name or Initial: Age of Child in Years/Months:  Date of Observation:  Beginning and Ending Time of Observation Setting: People Included in the Observation:  Observation Notes- Include in the notes exactly what you see the child doing including language or sounds if an infant. Use sentences and not phrases. Do not include any of your interpretations about the child’s behavior that will be written as part of the Observation Report.

OBSERVATION

Examples for how to use the Headings for the Child Observation Reports for different ages are described under the specific ages below.

SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS FOR WRITING ABOUT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS

Child Observation Report #1 Infant OR Toddler Observation Assignment:

Spend at least 60 minutes observing a child who is an infant or toddler (from 4 months to 2 years four months). Keep a running record of what you are observing the child do in his environment. Include any sounds or words the child makes. Describe the behavior in objective terms described as facts writing exactly what you see the child doing and saying. Do not label the child’s behavior in subjective terms described as opinion. He is happy, selfish etc.  Using these notes transcribe the phases from the notes taken during the observation time into complete sentences and insert the notes into the observation notes form.

The behaviors you observe should show an intertwining of at least two development domains seen in growth and development, not just one simple behavior. For example, don’t just look at a child beginning to talk (a language/cognitive skill) with a simple babble, but describe the social domain that accompanies this as the infant tries to interact with others (a social/emotional skill), using his new language babbling skills.

Some areas that might be interesting to look for when you observe (look at the infant toddler chapters in the text to consider what you might see before you go to observe):

· Physical: Body changes in height, weight, and motor movement; gross and/or fine motor skills.

· Cognitive: Sensorimotor levels/behaviors; object permanence skills; memory; language development.

· Social-Emotional: Attachment; temperament; self-awareness; interaction with others; emotions

· Self-help skills: See the developmental checklist of behaviors that are listed by age on the developmental checklist. The skills may be used as a domain i.e. self- feeding can be self-help as well as biosocial motor skill.

Remember to connect your observation to explanations of multiple domains of development.

For example:

This Behavior Example with two domains for Sally (age 12 months) includes a paragraph with a quote about typical development and then another paragraph about how the child’s behavior compares to the quote about typical development. Two domains for the same behavior are discussed in separate paragraph. Your observation notes will be longer as you will be observing the child for at least 60 minutes.

Anecdotal Observation Notes

Sally (12 months) was sitting on the floor in the living room. Using her hands, arms and legs, she pulled herself up to stand balancing on the couch by holding on with both her hands. Smiling Sally held on to the couch cushion and lifted each hand and arm and moved each leg in a side step movement along the outside of couch cushions. Sally then moved to the end table putting out her left hand first and then her right hand. Sally stopped and then paused for 15 seconds. She took her hands off the table at the same time and quickly lowered herself to the floor. She said “Oh!” as she sat on the floor.

Behavior One and Two Domains

Behavior One is an example of both biosocial and cognitive development. “Smiling Sally (12

months) held on to the couch cushion and lifted each hand and arm and moved each leg in a side step movement along the outside of couch cushions.”

Behavior One Domain One Quote for Typical Development

In Behavior One Domain One, Sally has developed biosocial gross motor skills that are seen in older infants. Infants who are Sally’s age of 12 months are beginning to start to use their walking motor skills. According to the Developmental Checklist Birth to Five from the Mid-State Early Childhood Direction Center, infants from the age of 8-12 months will “walk and holding on to furniture (10-13 months)”. Infants may also “walk two or three steps without support (11-13 months)”.

Behavior One Domain One Analysis to a Quote for Typical Development 

Using the gross motor skills for the biosocial domain, walking requires balance and integration of muscle control. Since Sally is now 12 months, she is demonstrating that she has achieved balance in her biosocial motor skills by her ability to walk holding onto the couch and table. Walking by holding onto an object is also an example of integration of motor skills that shows Sally is typically developing in her biosocial skills. Her ability to walk using an object like furniture is the beginning stage of walking independently for an infant who is 11-13 months. She has not yet developed independent walking skills that is also typical of a child who is age 12-14 months. Developmentally Sally could be walking independently at 12 months according to the developmental checklist.

 

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