Computer Science

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Crisis types

Example: simple method of defining crises

Category 1: Minor damage to physical facilities or minor injury to personnel addressable with on-site resources or limited off-site assistance

Category 2: Major damage to physical facilities or injury to personnel requiring considerable off-site assistance

Category 3: Organization-wide crisis requiring evacuation of organizational facilities, if possible, and/or cessation of organizational functions pending resolution of the crisis

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

23

23

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Crisis management team structure

Identifies the CM team and its responsibilities

Individuals who handle the crisis in the event if the CM plan activated

Responsibility and control

CM team leader or an executive-in-charge assumes overall responsibility

Chain of command

List of officials: immediate supervisor to top executive

Executive-in-charge

Ranking executive on-site

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

24

24

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Responsibility and control (cont’d.)

Clearly defined executive-in-charge roster

Chief executive officer/president

Senior vice president

Vice president for operations/chief operations officer

Implementation

Plan implementation including contingencies

Provides alternatives for optimal and less than optimal situations

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

25

25

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Crisis management protocols

Detailed notification protocol for common crisis or emergency events

Include whom to contact and when

Event examples

Medical emergency

Violent crime or behavior

Political situations

Off-campus incidents; accidents involving employees

Environmental or natural disasters

Bomb threats

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

26

26

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Crisis management plan priorities

Details effort priorities for CM team and other responsible individuals

Requires the establishment of general priorities

Each may have subordinate priorities

Appendices

Communications roster

Building layouts or floor plans clearly marked

Emergency exits, fire suppression systems, fire extinguishers, emergency equipment

Planning checklists detailing who prepares what

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

27

27

Developing the Crisis Management Plan (cont’d.)

Sample CM plan

Available in book’s Opening Case Scenarios and Ongoing Cases

Included in Appendix C

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

28

28

Crisis Management Training and Testing

CM training follows same blueprints and procedures of IR, DR, and BC

Desk check, talk-throughs, walk-throughs, simulation, and other exercises

Use on a regular basis

Helps prepare for crises

Helps keep the CM plan up to date

Emergency roster test

After hours notification tests or alert roster tests

Determine employees ability to respond

Automated or manual notifications

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

29

29

Crisis Management Training and Testing (cont’d.)

Tabletop exercises

Scenario-driven talk-through

Employees are given a general scenario and sequence of several unfolding events or “injections” and asked to describe how they would respond

Messages can be passed around the table

Simulation

Conduct exercises simulating a crisis

May schedule simulation in conjunction with a fire department training exercise

Works well for small-scale and large-scale events

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

30

30

Crisis Management Training and Testing (cont’d.)

First aid training

Many larger organizations have training and formal procedures to assist first responders

Can be used during crisis-response activities

Have first aid kits and know how to use contents

Routinely check contents

Encouraged staff to have first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training

Provide easy-to-use heart defibrillators

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

31

31

Crisis Management Training and Testing (cont’d.)

Other crisis management preparations

Elements that can help if CM plan needed

Emergency kits, emergency identification cards, and medical condition notifications

Emergency kits

Provide essential components

Copies of the DR, BC, and CM plans, laminated checklist of preliminary CM steps, laminated map with marked assembly areas and shelters, laminated card with emergency numbers, flashlights, reflective vests, warning triangle, caution tape, first aid kit with rubber gloves, clipboard, notepad, pens, markers, spray paint

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

32

32

Crisis Management Training and Testing (cont’d.)

ID cards

Provide a crisis management identification card

Provides quick reference for critical CM information

Provides critical personal information

Medical alert tags and bracelets

Consider the protection of personal privacy

May be necessary to ask employees about any medical conditions to consider during crisis

Covered in part with the emergency ID cards

Consider use of medical alert tags or bracelets

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

33

33

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

34

34

Post-crisis Trauma

Anyone can suffer severe traumatic episode side effects

Look out for the well-being of all individuals

Not just those directly affected by the crisis

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

35

35

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Shell shock, battle fatigue, or battle neurosis

Widely recognized psychiatric disorder

Make preparations for the fallout from PTSD

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

36

36

Employee Assistance Programs

Employee assistance program (EAP)

Part of health benefits or contracted out as needed

Provides counseling services

Assist employees in coping with the changes in life resulting from surviving a crisis

EAPs fill the need to talk through issues that people are unable to deal with on their own

Humanitarian response team as part of CM team

Counselors, legal aids, medical professionals, interpreters

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

37

37

Immediately after the Crisis

Assembly areas used to gather employees

Use automated notification systems, supervisor head counts, and buddy system to account for employees

Formally release personnel after accounted for

Resist urge to move employees out as quickly as possible

Before employees released

Hold one final information briefing

Provide an overview of what happened, who was affected, and what the next course of business will be

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

38

38

Immediately after the Crisis (cont’d.)

Dealing with families

CM plan should prepare organization’s management and staff to interact with family members

Especially if serious injury or loss of life occurred

May require professional assistance

Legal counsel, grief counselors, and employees formally trained to deal with these situations

Follow up with employees receiving medical care at clinics or hospitals

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

39

39

Getting People Back to Work

Conduct a briefing of all employees, either directly or through managers and supervisors

Without facts, rumor mill will run rampant

Use internal counseling sessions (individual and group)

Mixed opinions about debriefing activities

Some PTSD research indicates

Debriefing process itself may exacerbate problems experienced following a stressful event

Use skilled crisis-management professionals to monitor and follow up on the affected workforce

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

40

40

Dealing with Loss

Result of death or serious injury or an unwillingness to return to the workplace

Skills and organizational knowledge may be lost

Use cross-training, job and task rotation, and redundancy to help

Cross-training

Process of ensuring that every employee is trained to perform at least part of the job of another employee

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

41

41

Dealing with Loss (cont’d.)

Job and task rotation

Job rotation

Movement of employees from one position to another so they can develop additional skills and abilities

Horizontal job rotation

Movement of employees among positions at the same organizational level rather than through progression and promotion

Task rotation

Functionally similar to job rotation but only involves the rotation of a portion of a job

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

42

42

Dealing with Loss (cont’d.)

Personnel redundancy

Provides assurance in the coverage of critical skills and knowledge

Personnel costs: large business expenses

Redundant personnel

Individuals hired above and beyond the minimum number of personnel needed to perform a business function

May not be the best option for all businesses

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

43

43

Law Enforcement Involvement

Contact law enforcement during a crisis

Have trained in skills specifically geared to CM

Crowd control, search and rescue, first aid, physical security

Dial 911 in the United States and Canada

Dial 999 in other countries

Level of involvement may escalate quickly

Through state investigative agencies to federal agents and officers

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

44

44

Federal Agencies

Federal agencies involved in a crisis

Dependent on the type and scope of the crisis

Department of Homeland Security (DHS)

Federal agency most specifically organized to handle crises: (http://www.dhs.gov)

Especially threats to the safety of U.S. citizens and potential damage to infrastructure

DHS and FEMA sponsor a public education site to provide information on preparing for crisis

http://ready.gov

Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition

45

Order now and get 10% discount on all orders above $50 now!!The professional are ready and willing handle your assignment.

ORDER NOW »»