Applied Sciences

E 1 Assignment Sheet

E 1 – Rhetorical Analysis Essay Assignment Sheet

E 1 Final Due Date: Thursday, April 16th by 11:59 p.m. CST – Late work is NOT accepted even with technological issues.

Length: 550-600 words, 11- or 12-point font, Times New Roman, double-spaced, include a Works Cited page. Your ONLY source should be the website provided for your below.

A rhetorical analysis is an essay that breaks a work of non-fiction into parts and then explains how the parts work together to create a certain effect — whether to persuade, entertain or inform. A rhetorical analysis should explore the rhetorician’s goals, the techniques (or tools) used, examples of those techniques, and the effectiveness of those techniques. When writing a rhetorical analysis, you are NOT saying whether or not you agree with the argument. Instead, you’re discussing how the choices the rhetorician makes within the argument (rhetorical literary devices) and whether or not the approach used is effective.

DIRECTIONS: For this assignment, you will write an analysis of the rhetorical writing strategies and techniques Elie Wiesel uses in his speech – The Perils of Indifference, to achieve his purpose in his essay. Basically, does the Wiesel’s choices (of rhetorical/literary devices in his argument effect the reader/audience and explain how and why? ).  Basically, was his use of rhetorical devices in his speech effective or ineffective? Your claim statement should answer this question. Apply your critical reading skills to break down the whole of the text into the sum of its parts. Do NOT summarize or analyze the message of the speech or bring in other sources.

In your introduction, along with your thesis statement, you can include Wiesel’s use of: They say, I say, the answer to the “so what?,” the answer to the “who cares?,” and the naysayers.

MLA Reminders:

· Your Works Cited entry should be the formula- article on the website (page 151 on top of the page). In your The Little Seagull textbook. Do NOT include the URL.

· For in-text citations, read the entire section titled “MLA-a In-Text Documentation” in your The Little Seagull textbook starting on page 122.

Elie Wiesel’s speech – The Perils of Indifference –  (If needed, COPY and PASTE LINK TO URL):

https://americanrhetoric.com/speeches/ewieselperilsofindifference.html ,

Reminders:

· Do not summarize the speech or analyze the message, but instead break down the whole and analyze the parts of the speech. If you summarize, you will earn a 50.

· You need a works cited page and in-text citations. Inside your in-text citations, you should have the writer’s last name such as (Wiesel).

· Do not use contractions. You will earn a 10 point deduction of your essay.

· Failure to follow directions will result in a 50.

Rhetorical Analysis Outline

Directions: Use this outline to help organize your essay 1.

Introduction

· They Say (1 sentence)

· I Say (1 sentence)

· So what? (aka why is knowing about indifference important?) (1 sentence)

· Who cares? (aka who should care about this topic of indifference?) (1 sentence)

· Claim statement – Wiesel utilizes three main rhetorical devices to effectively (OR ineffectively – choose one) write his speech. (something like this) (1 sentence)

Body Paragraph 1

· Topic sentence – mention one of the rhetorical devices (i.e. logos, ethos, and pathos) (1 sentence)

· Provide an example from the speech. (i.e. direct quote) (one direct quote)

· Explain WHY this is an example of your chosen rhetorical device (2-4 sentences)

· Connect this example back to your claim statement (2-3 sentences)

Body Paragraph 2

· Topic sentence – mention one of the rhetorical devices (i.e. logos, ethos, and pathos) (1 sentence)

· Provide an example from the speech. (i.e. direct quote) (one direct quote)

· Explain WHY this is an example of your chosen rhetorical device (2-4 sentences)

· Connect this example back to your claim statement (2-3 sentences)

Body Paragraph 3

· Topic sentence – mention one of the rhetorical devices (i.e. logos, ethos, and pathos) (1 sentence)

· Provide an example from the speech. (i.e. direct quote) (one direct quote)

· Explain WHY this is an example of your chosen rhetorical device (2-4 sentences)

· Connect this example back to your claim statement (2-3 sentences)

Conclusion

· Restate your claim statement (1 sentence)

· Summarize your logos paragraph (1 sentence)

· Summarize your pathos paragraph (1 sentence)

· Summarize your ethos paragraph (1 sentence)

· So what? (aka – Why is Wiesel’s speech of indifference important for society?) (1 sentence)

Sample Student Essay do not include this in your heading

First and Last Name

Professor Ramirez-Buck

ENGL 1302-XXXXX

02 February 2020

Essay #1: The Perils of Indifference Rhetorical Analysis

Elie Wiesel, a Nobel laureate, conducted a speech attended by then President Bill Clinton, first lady Hillary Clinton, and others, titled The Perils of Indifference. In his speech, Wiesel implements an array of rhetorical devices to emphasize not only the importance of his message but the inherent dangers of indifference, stating, “Indifference, after all, is more dangerous than anger and hatred.” (par. 9). Wiesel’s usage of these devices is quite effective, drawing upon his personal experiences, deep knowledge and pulling at the heart strings of the audience through his oratorical abilities.

Wiesel opens his address with the usage of the rhetorical device ethos. Wiesel says, “He was finally free, but there was no joy in his heart. He thought there never would be again. Liberated a day earlier by American soldiers, he remembers their rage at what they saw…” (par. 2). Shortly after, Wiesel reveals that this young Jewish boy he is referencing was himself, “And now, I stand before you, Mr. President – Commander-in-Chief of the army that freed me…” (par. 3). These two statements immediately establish a certain credibility that otherwise would not be present should the speech be provided by someone with no firsthand experience of the harrows of indifference. Through this immediate establishment of credibility, Wiesel effectively implements ethos conveying to his audience that he has the credentials required to speak upon the topic at hand.

Following his brief introduction and establishment of credibility, Wiesel touches upon the tragedies that occurred in the 20th century and the significant impact indifference can have and the negatives that inherently accompany it. Wiesel does use logos here, but the most striking rhetorical device used is pathos when Wiesel delves into “The depressing tale of the St. Louis…” (par. 16). “Sixty years ago, its human cargo – nearly 1,000 Jews – was turned back to Nazi Germany. And that happened after the Kristallnacht, after the first state sponsored pogrom, with hundreds of Jewish shops destroyed, synagogues burned, thousands of people put in concentration camps. And that ship…was sent back.” (Wiesel par. 16). Wiesel continues his focus on this tragedy, “Why didn’t he allow those refugees to disembark? A thousand people – in America, the great country, the greatest democracy, the most generous of all new nations in modern history…Why the indifference, on the highest level, to the suffering of the victims?” (par. 17). Here Wiesel connects the audience to a specific event, forcing them to recognize the absolute tragedy of the situation, eliciting an emotional response and placing a newfound understanding of why indifference is terrible in their minds directly because of this usage of pathos.

In addition to ethos and pathos, Wiesel implements the rhetorical device logos successfully through his reference of the events that have transpired throughout this century, examples being the Righteous Gentiles, the St. Louis incident, the “senseless chain of assassinations…” (par. 4). Wiesel employs this device so successfully due to these citing of facts and historical analogies. This is especially effective for his intention as it shows the audience that Wiesel is not only speaking from personal experience through his implementation of ethos, but he is able to demonstrate that he has arrived at this opinion of indifference through logical means.

Wiesel effectively utilizes the three rhetorical devices of ethos, pathos and logos. Wiesel establishes credibility, elicits emotional responses from the audience and arrives to his conclusions through logical means supporting his statement regarding indifference and the dangers that accompany it. In conclusion, Wiesel finalizes his speech with a message of both caution and hope, saying “…together we walk towards the new millennium, carried by profound fear and extraordinary hope.” (par. 25). With this quote, he drives his message of caution and hope to future generations.

Works Cited

Wiesel, Elie. “The Perils of Indifference.” American Rhetoric. 4 April 1999.

Washington D.C. Accessed 2 February 2020.

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